Tag Archives: Info Lombok

The new Bali? Indonesia hopes so

An article published in the Sydney Morning Herald, dated Jan 25, 2011

The new Bali? Indonesia hopes so

Traffic jams are now common in Bali, a victim of its own success in pulling in swarms of tourists and using the money to buy cars and turn rice paddies into hotels.

Across a narrow sea channel lies Lombok, another volcanic island ringed by beaches, where in the capital Mataram the few foreign visitors are more likely to be slowed down by a horse-drawn cart than a tailback of Toyotas.

But authorities in Indonesia, a current emerging market investor darling, have big plans for the island.
A new international airport is expected to open later this year, and Qatar’s sovereign wealth fund is leading a bidding race to develop an unspoilt southern coastline of white sand into a world class resort and luxury residential community.

Indonesia hopes such projects will overhaul its poor infrastructure, seen as both a hurdle to growth and a cash making opportunity, with Asia showing the most investment interest in a sign of new money flows between emerging markets.

Lombok’s leading exclusive development so far, Indian-owned The Oberoi, an isolated and expansive resort of manicured lawns and infinity pools facing Bali, was chosen as the venue for a meeting of Southeast Asian foreign ministers this week.

“We brought the ministers here to show them how unspoilt it is … and the opportunities,” Indonesia’s Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa said during a stroll through the grounds.

Tourism contributes just 2-3 per cent to the country’s GDP, versus 6 per cent for Thailand, and economists believe boosting Indonesia’s service industries could be a new engine of growth for Southeast Asia’s biggest economy.

Indonesia’s 17,000 islands stretch from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific, and offer pristine coral reefs, diverse cultures, archaeological monuments, striking volcanic scenery and dense rainforests with unique wildlife such as orangutans.

“We think we can do eco-tourism,” said Natalegawa. “We discussed as a group what value-add the region can offer, and we think it is forests and the marine environment,” he said, after taking his counterparts to get their feet wet by releasing baby turtles into the waves and planting trees along the shore.

Despite the symbolic gesture, and a deal with Norway to earn $1 billion by halting forest clearing, the country’s environmental record is poor. Deforestation led it to be the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter in 2005, according to the World Bank, with palm oil and timber plantations putting the Sumatran tiger and Javan rhino at risk of extinction.

A bitter dispute between the palm oil industry and environmentalists underlines the difficulties for the region of spurring economic growth and preserving its environment.

HARDER SELL

Southeast Asia still has plenty of exotic spots that it could promote, especially in Indonesia and Cambodia, said Surin Pitsuwan, head of regional political group ASEAN, also pointing to Myanmar if moves towards democracy enabled investment.

ASEAN, home to 500 million people, aims to liberalise air traffic and invest in improving regional road links.
Local authorities in Lombok, whose wildlife contributed to the theory of evolution through naturalist Alfred Wallace, are keen to develop the industry, but there is no guarantee Bali’s tourism success can be reproduced elsewhere in the archipelago.

Lombok’s culture is not as obviously rich as Bali’s, lacking its famous dances or unique brand of Hinduism, while Bali has learnt over centuries what foreigners look for and still-smiling locals are multilingual. By contrast Lombok’s interior offers a tough hike up active volcano Mount Rinjani and some hard stares.

“People come to Bali for the culture, not the view – the view is better in the Maldives. Here in Lombok it’s nature,” said Widi, from Bali and working at the Sheraton on Senggigi, currently the only developed strip of beach on Lombok, but where an empty coastal road divides surfers and boutique villas from thatched shacks and green mountain humps.

With no timeframe to complete the $600 million project to put 10,000 luxury villas on the southern coast, it seems Lombok is not yet ready for the region’s leaders – Indonesia will host a meeting of Asian prime ministers in Bali later this year.

“Tourism development would be a great thing here in Lombok,” said Widi. “I just hope they plan it better than Bali.”

Lombok Climate

With the exception of the highlands, most of Indonesia has a very moist (often over 90{73c3f12038ac8ffc68faa73467795b962c656c71fb4655564176b6dcb7acd9e9}) tropical rainy climate, with average monthly temperatures vary little from the high annual average around 25 to 27 ° C.

The maximum temperature may reach a value of 36 ° C. The temperature in the range is reduced by about 1 ° C per 170 meter increase off. In the central mountains of New Guinea is at approximately 4500 meter peaks above the snow and the mercury to drop to below freezing.

Parts of Java, Bali, Nusa Tenggara, Sulawesi, the Moluccas and Irian Jaya have a savannah climate with a short dry season. in the Palu Valley of Central Sulawesi is less than 500 mm annually, and is the driest area of the archipelago.

On the islands south east Timor and Roti, the dry season lasting seven months. As for precipitation vary considerably, both in quantity and for the year during which it falls. From December to late March, the prevailing winds from the northeast on North Sumatra, Kalimantan and Sulawesi, but during the passage of the equator, and they are bending over Java, Nusa Tenggara and beyond west northwest.

From June to October is the opposite direction, with an exceptionally dry air from the Australian desert to the southern half of Indonesia passes and over the southeast of Sumatra in a southwesterly direction changes. Then this air flow has become much water included. The rainfall is not evenly distributed throughout the year.

There are dry and wet months. It takes several months in dry generally from west to east and from north to south. It is spoken as a dry months, less than 60 mm rainfall. But in areas highly exposed to the monsoon rainfall is much heavier for. In Padang example, on the southwest h Exhibition of Sumatra, is about 4500 mm annually.

The average annual rainfall is between 2000 and 3000 mm, 1800 mm in Jakarta. In general one can say that from October to May in Indonesia wet-monsoon period ( “musim hujan ‘) is. In the afternoon rains often several hours very localized, so everything refreshed and the temperature drops slightly.

Most rain falls in January and February. The dry season ( ‘musim kemarau’), from May to October, it is favorable to travel. It is very hot, and there is only occasionally a little rain that nature again refreshed.

Source: http://www . landenweb.net

Lombok Geography

Location

Lombok (113 km x 81 km) is an Indonesian island that belongs to the Lesser Sunda Islands. It lies in the Indian Ocean east of Bali and west of Sumbawa.

The island has an area of 4725 km ² and has 2.4 million inhabitants. The capital is Mataram. The city has about 360,000 inhabitants and is located on the west side of the island. Senggigi, Mataram and the mid-Gili. Lombok is slightly smaller than Bali, is much less touristy and the people are poorer.

Flora and Fauna

The island consists of rugged forested mountains to the sea often continue. Around the island winds a road full of hairpin bends, which have been built in the Dutch period.

The interior is rugged and undeveloped, while the flat and fertile parts of the coastal rice, soybeans, coffee, tobacco, cotton, cinnamon and vanilla are grown. The second highest volcano in In donesië, Gunung Rinjani, Lombok and is situated at 3726 meter high.

Lombok in the west is separated by the Strait of Bali and Lombok in the east of Sumbawa by the Alas Strait. To the northwest coast of Lombok are some tropical islands. The most important are Gili Air, Gili Meno and Gili Trawangan.

They are popular diving and snorkeling destinations because they are surrounded by coral reefs with a variety of underwater animals such as sharks and numerous turtles. Visibility is more than 20 meter and the water temperature around 26 ° C.

Lombok is located on the “boundary” of the Asian and the Australian ecosystem, the so-called Wallace Line. Therefore Lombok has a wide variety of animals including monkeys, wild cattle, deer, many species (including the remarkable muntjakhert), wild boars, wild cats and numerous birds, including the Australian crested cockatoo.

Source: http://nl.wikipedia.org

Lombok Population

Composition

Lombok has over 2 million inhabitants. 80{73c3f12038ac8ffc68faa73467795b962c656c71fb4655564176b6dcb7acd9e9} of them are Islamic Sasak, Balinese Hindu is 10{73c3f12038ac8ffc68faa73467795b962c656c71fb4655564176b6dcb7acd9e9}, 5{73c3f12038ac8ffc68faa73467795b962c656c71fb4655564176b6dcb7acd9e9} Bodhas (Aboriginal) and 5{73c3f12038ac8ffc68faa73467795b962c656c71fb4655564176b6dcb7acd9e9} are Chinese and Arabs.

Probably the Sasak came from an ancient migration wave of the Malays. From West-India, Burma and Java they came to Lombok. They are darker and some of them wear long wavy hair. They live mainly in the more remote areas while the Balinese people live in the poorer cities.

Although, they still have some Islamic habbits of the Hindu-Balinese people. There is a kind of caste system among the Sasak, and the circumcision ceremony of a Hindu minds is more to be Islamic. The boys are considered to suffer pain for Allah.

The Sasak are well versed in the ikat weaving and rattan baskets weaving. Ikat handloom made wires which are pre-painted with special patterns. The pottery from Lombok consists mainly of large vases and jars.

The clothing of the men consists of a kain batik with ikat edge. The women wear black kain baju Lambung with a black and red scarf.

Religion

Besides Hinduism of the Lombok Balinese, it has two types of Muslims among the Sasak. The Waktu Telu and Waktu Lima.

30{73c3f12038ac8ffc68faa73467795b962c656c71fb4655564176b6dcb7acd9e9} of the Sasak people, are Waktu Telu, sometimes named three prayers . Telu means 3, and represents a trinity, Allah, Muhammad and Adam or Heaven, Earth and Water, or Body, Head and Limbs.

The Waktu Telu does’t have a Ramadan, but a period of 3 days fasting and praying. The pilgrimage to Mecca is not undertaken, it is the dead buried with the face to Mecca. The funeral is associated with the ancient rituals to the spirit guide to the underworld.

The Waktu Telu have no fixed times of prayer, one can as often and wherever they want prayer. Although Waktu Telu themselves as Muslims as such are not accepted by the Muslim world. Most live in the south central part of the small mountain villages, with traditional round thatched huts. Actually, this religion you better be described as traditional with a strong Islamic element.

The Waktu Lima, or five Islamic prayers. This group lives in the lowland and coastal. They are orthodox Muslims.

For both groups the Adat (the ancient customary law) just as important as religion. Sin against the adat can be punished by illness, madness, poverty or death.

Source: http://www.vnc.n

Indonesia Climate

With the exception of the highlands, most of Indonesia has a very moist (often over 90{73c3f12038ac8ffc68faa73467795b962c656c71fb4655564176b6dcb7acd9e9}) tropical rainy climate, with average monthly temperatures vary little from the high annual average around 25 to 27 ° C.

The maximum temperature may reach a value of 36 ° C. The temperature in the range is reduced by about 1 ° C per 170 meter increase off. In the central mountains of New Guinea is at approximately 4500 meter peaks above the snow and the mercury to drop to below freezing.

Parts of Java, Bali, Nusa Tenggara, Sulawesi, the Moluccas and Irian Jaya have a savannah climate with a short dry season. in the Palu Valley of Central Sulawesi is less than 500 mm annually, and is the driest area of the archipelago.

On the islands south east Timor and Roti, the dry season lasting seven months. As for precipitation vary considerably, both in quantity and for the year during which it falls. From December to late March, the prevailing winds from the northeast on North Sumatra, Kalimantan and Sulawesi, but during the passage of the equator, and they are bending over Java, Nusa Tenggara and beyond west northwest.

From June to October is the opposite direction, with an exceptionally dry air from the Australian desert to the southern half of Indonesia passes and over the southeast of Sumatra in a southwesterly direction changes. Then this air flow has become much water included. The rainfall is not evenly distributed throughout the year.

There are dry and wet months. It takes several months in dry generally from west to east and from north to south. It is spoken as a dry months, less than 60 mm rainfall. But in areas highly exposed to the monsoon rainfall is much heavier for. In Padang example, on the southwest h Exhibition of Sumatra, is about 4500 mm annually.

The average annual rainfall is between 2000 and 3000 mm, 1800 mm in Jakarta. In general one can say that from October to May in Indonesia wet-monsoon period ( “musim hujan ‘) is. In the afternoon rains often several hours very localized, so everything refreshed and the temperature drops slightly.

Most rain falls in January and February. The dry season ( ‘musim kemarau’), from May to October, it is favorable to travel. It is very hot, and there is only occasionally a little rain that nature again refreshed.

Source: http://www . landenweb.net

Indonesia Geography

General

Indonesia consists of 17,508 islands, about 6,000 of which are inhabited. These are scattered over both sides of the equator. The five largest islands are Java, Sumatra, Kalimantan (the Indonesian part of Borneo), New Guinea (shared with Papua New Guinea), and Sulawesi. Indonesia shares land borders with Malaysia on the islands of Borneo and Sebatik, Papua New Guinea on the island of New Guinea, and East Timor on the island of Timor.

Indonesia also shares borders with Singapore, Malaysia, and the Philippines to the north and Australia to the south across narrow straits of water. The capital, Jakarta, is on Java and is the nation’s largest city, followed by Surabaya, Bandung, Medan, and Semarang. At 1,919,440 square kilometers (741,050 sq mi), Indonesia is the world’s 16th-largest country in terms of land area.I ts average population density is 134 people per square kilometer (347 per sq mi), 79th in the world,[62] although Java, the world’s most populous island, has a population density of 940 people per square kilometer (2,435 per sq mi). At 4,884 meters (16,024 ft), Puncak Jaya in Papua is Indonesia’s highest peak, and Lake Toba in Sumatra its largest lake, with an area of 1,145 square kilometers (442 sq mi). The country’s largest rivers are in Kalimantan, and include the Mahakam and Barito; such rivers are communication and transport links between the island’s river settlements.

Indonesia’s location on the edges of the Pacific, Eurasian, and Australian tectonic plates makes it the site of numerous volcanoes and frequent earthquakes. Indonesia has at least 150 active volcanoes, including Krakatoa and Tambora, both famous for their devastating eruptions in the 19th century. The eruption of the Toba supervolcano, approximately 70,000 years ago, was one of the largest eruptions ever, and a global catastrophe. Recent disasters due to seismic activity include the 2004 tsunami that killed an estimated 167,736 in northern Sumatra, and the Yogyakarta earthquake in 2006. However, volcanic ash is a major contributor to the high agricultural fertility that has historically sustained the high population densities of Java and Bali

Indonesia Population

Composition

Anthropologists divide the people of Indonesia in three main groups. The Balinese, Madurese, the Malays of Sumatra and the Irish and Massakarezen Bugis of Sulawesi are among the Deutero-Malay peoples. They generally have a slender physique, a copper-colored skin and really pronounced Mongoloid features.

The Dayaks of Kalimantan, and the Toradja Toalans of Sulawesi, including the Konjo, and their Btaks of Sumatra are known as proto-

The Austronesian peoples of the eastern islands are contrary weather darker and have a heavier build.

In the Indonesian archipelago live more than 300 distinct ethnic groups, each with its own identity. There are huge physical differences between people in different parts of the archipelago, in terms of pigmentation, hair type, shape and facial features. This ethnographic diversity can be explained by the successive waves of migration from mainland Asia and maybe even from Africa. The various groups arrived in a series of massive waves of migration, at intervals of several centuries. How all this work has gone is still not well understood. A more likely explanation is that small groups from Asia, the Indonesian area slowly came to and, over thousands of years, with the original mixed population Australoïde, and ultimately have largely replaced.

The vast majority of the population belongs to the Malay race. There are clear cultural differences mainly between Batak eg, Dayaks and other Toradja and Javanese, the largest group, Sundanese, Madurese, Irish Male in the narrower sense, Minangkabau, Acehnese, Balinese, and Buginese. In Irian Jaya and the surrounding islands live up to the Melanesian group, Papuans. Nations which have characteristics of both the Malays and Melanesians Irish found on Maluku and Nusa Tenggara, particularly in Timor. There are some small, isolated living, belonging to the European main breed groups, such as in Sumatra and Koeboes Mentawaiers.

The Chinese, of whom more than 5 million, represent by far the largest ethnic subgroup in Indonesian society. The Chinese live mostly in port cities and larger towns in Java, Sumatra and Kalimantan. They dominate the market and among the wealthy in Indonesia. The economic success of the Chinese, the relationship with other Indonesians any easier.

Brief description of the population on the large islands

SUMATRA

The bulk of the population lives in Sumatra long chain of undulating hills at the foot of the Bukit Barisan ‘and along rivers and lakes in the highlands. It is home to two major indigenous peoples, and the Minangkabau Bataks. We share here a number of smaller ethnic groups such as Acehnese, Gayo’s, Alas, Kubu, Kerinci, Rejang, Mentawei, Enggano and Lampung.

The highlands are thus the habitat of more than three million members of the six main Batakstammen, the Toba, Karo, Pakpak, Simalungun, and Mandailing Angkola. They each display their own dialect, customs and architecture. The Bataks more than 1500 years ago to Sumatra drawn from the mountains of the Himalayas in northern Myanmar and Thailand.

Under the Northern Bataks are still animists, Muslims in the southern Bataks, especially Mandailing. Bataks by many German and Dutch missionaries converted to Christianity.

The Minangkabau live mainly in West Sumatra and are related to the Malays of the Irish east coast of Sumatra. There are currently around seven million Minangkabau, West Sumatra in three million and four million scattered in major cities throughout Indonesia. The Minangkabau have, unlike the Bataks example, traditionally a high degree of literacy and general management skills. This is why they always played an important role in the political, economic and scientific development of Indonesia. Many famous writers and Indonesian leaders are also coming from West Sumatra.

JAVA

The Javanese themselves constitute about two thirds of the total population (approx. 79 million) and inhabit the fertile plains of Central and East Java, and much of the north coast. In the higher parts of West Java, the population mainly Muslim Sundanese (approx. 30 million), on the island of Madura and the opposite parts of East Java are home to many Madurese. The Sundanese are in appearance indistinguishable from the Javanese in Central and East Java. In the far west Badui life and in the extreme east of Tenggerezen. In the major port cities along the northern coast, a lot of Arabs, Chinese and Europeans established.

The Sundanese have its own culture, with the complex and angklung gamelan music, the popular and lively dances jaipongan golek wayang performances.

The steep slopes of active volcanoes Gunung Semeru and Mount Bromo are inhabited for centuries by the people of the Hindu Tenggerezen. The Tenggerezen, of which an estimated 40,000 remain, trapped in oppression by the steadily increasing vetsiging of Madurese and Central Javanese people.

The Baduy belong to the so-called Mandala community, which relies on a belief in Hindu-Buddhist Oudjavaans draw

BALI

The largest population group in Bali is the Balinese (about 3 million), descended from the second wave of people movers.

Bali was inhabited relatively early and developed a Balinese Hindu-Buddhist culture with its own high character. Bali has the largest Hindu community in the world outside India. Ninety percent of the Balinese people is the follower of Balinese Hinduism.

Until the early 20th century, the Balinese totally isolated from the rest of the world.

LOMBOK

The people of Lombok (approx. 1.7 million) consists Sasak Muslim, Hindu Balinese, Chinese and Arabs. Approximately 10% of the population is Hindu, and most Lombok Lombok Cherry live in cities and villages on the narrow plain in the middle west of the island. The vast majority of the population is Sasak, itself a distinction between two more or less distinct groups, the Waktu-telu who live in the mountains and Waktu Lima, who live in the lowlands.

The handful of remaining original inhabitants, the Bodha, lives in the isolated southeast of the island.

Nusa Tenggara – the Lesser Sunda Islands

The inhabitants of the western part of Nusa Tenggara have Mongolian features, which tend more to the east of the Melanesian type.

Nusa Tenggara is one of the poorest and most arid areas of Indonesia. Most of the approximately 10 million inhabitants are farmers or fishermen Nusa Tenggara.

The people of Sumbawa are Muslims. West Sumba has approximately 350,000 inhabitants, with two separate language groups. The people are still living in traditional stilt houses and the worship of the land and the ancestors is still alive. East Sumba is dry and rocky and has approximately 250,000 inhabitants who all speak the same language.

Flores is the largest island in the eastern part of Nusa Tenggara. Of the approximately 1.4 million inhabitants of Flores is now 90% Catholic, but interspersed with many traditional views and practices.

In the east of Nusa Tenggara is a number of smaller islands, including Solor, Adonara, Lembata, Pantar, Alor, Roti and Sawu. The inhabitants of these islands since time immemorial have maintained contact with each other and with the population of the larger islands, and have over centuries developed high cultures.

Kalimantan

Kalimantan is the name of the Indonesian territory that covers two thirds of the island of Borneo.The first people arrived from mainland Asia around 3000 BC Borneo. The bulk of the population, mostly Chinese and Malaysians, living in coastal areas. In East Kalimantan (“Kalimantan Timur” or Kaltim), but 1.5 million inhabitants live in an area as big as England and Scotland together.Most are farmers from overpopulated Java.

Central Kalimantan is home of the Dayaks, the collective name for about 200 different nations upstream of the rivers Kapuas, Barito and Mahakam live. The Ngaju are the largest of the groups of Dayaks living in the province. Many of them are converted by the Christian faith, but many others held on to the old belief of the Dayaks, that “kaharingan ‘called. Other tribes are known: Iban, Kenyah, Tunjung, Kayan, and Punane Benuaq.

The Penan tribe members are the original inhabitants of Borneo, the Dayaks who even lived.There are about 10,000 living in enclaves Penen in the upper catchment of the Apo Kayan and Mahakam.

The large Chinese community in West Kalimantan (“Kalimantan Barat” or Kalbar) comes from the miners here in the early 19th century flowed go. Most Chinese were living in these areas and married native women. Their descendants now form one of the largest Chinese communities in Indonesia.

Sulawesi (Celebes)

The island of Sulawesi is home to the Toradja’s of the highlands and the seafaring Bugis. The nine million islanders show a great variety: there are eg more than 40 different languages. The central location of Sulawesi in the Indonesian archipelago has contributed greatly to the heterogeneity of the population.

The coastal areas and the lowlands of South Sulawesi is now inhabited by Mongoloid peoples, collectively referred to as ‘Bugis’, traditionally sailors and shipbuilders.

In South Sulawesi live approximately 6 million inhabitants and an average of 125 inhabitants per km 2 is one of the most densely populated areas of Indonesia.

Between the rugged peaks and fertile plateaus of the southern part of Central Sulawesi is home to many isolated evolken alive, who share a common ancestry with the seafaring Bugis, Macassar and Manda rose. The coast of Sulawesi residents call these people the “Toraja” the “peoples of the highlands. Tanah Toraja or their habitat hot Toradjaland.

The Toradja’s traditionally lived in small fortified settlements on the hilltops. In the early 20th century were the Toradja’s Dutch colonial government contract to move from their hilltops to the more accessible and control valleys and lowlands. The Toradja’s owe their fame to the grand and colorful festivals that are held to ensure that the soul of a deceased to the grave or ‘puya’ can proceed in a manner consistent with their status on earth. In North Sulawesi are approximately 2.3 million people, more than 200,000 in the capital Manado.

The peoples of the Mongoloid Minahassers descendants of immigrants who settled here thousands of years ago. Their languages are related to the languages spoken in the Philippines.Later, Here also large numbers of Chinese and Europeans in this area established by marriages between the groups has created a mixed population.

Moluccas

Or the Moluccas Maluku is a province with thousands of islands scattered over an area of approximately 1.5 million km2.

The largest ethnic group in the Moluccas is the Ambonese, on Ambon, Saparua, Nusa Laut Seram and live.

The pagan Naulu are one of the few remaining people of the Moluccas who cling to their old traditions without religious influences.

Irian Jaya

Irian Jaya is the western half of New Guinea, after Greenland’s second largest island in the world (Greenland is the largest island). Irian Jaya is the most sparsely populated province of Indonesia. In most areas live less than six people per km2 and there are even areas not inhabited.

Indigenous Papuans are classified as blacks in the higher altitudes and living a very dark house, and a mixture of black and Melanesian races to the coast and in the lower hilly areas.

The first inhabitants of New Guinea arrived from the west, probably about 60,000 years ago.Small groups settled along the coast and not far inland locations. Probably the island was little contact between different groups, creating the incredible number of 800 languages buckle rooks on New Guinea, about 550 in Papua New Guinea and about 250 in Irian Jaya. Some languages are spoken by only 2,000 people.

People from southern China and Taiwan arrived on the island, but failed the majority of Papuans to resist assimilation by newcomers, who just settled on some nearby islands and coastal areas of the island.

In the fertile valley life Baliem the Dani, the famous tribe of the interior of Irian Jaya. They lived in relative isolation until their discovery in 1938. Now, after more than fifty years of contact with the outside world, the life styles have changed, but the men still wear only penis sheaths characteristic and women a skirt of grass.

The land of the Asmat, master woodcarvers from the marshes, the place is about agate. The 70,000-member Asmat tribe is the largest in the region and living in about 100 villages that are located in an area of 27,000 km2. Most of the Asmat live in the marshes have adopted the Christian faith.

The other people in the area are divided into two groups: the coastal peoples and the peoples of the interior. They speak different dialects and have a different way of life, social structure and ceremonies. The peoples on the coast are also divided into two groups: the Bisma and Simai.

Source:
http://www.landenweb.net

Emaar the boot?

Govt gives Emaar the boot, looks for new funds

Andi Haswidi , The Jakarta Post | Wed, 01/27/2010 3:37 PM | Headlines

The government has decided to terminate all commitments with Dubai-based Emaar Properties on a plan to build a US$600 million mega-tourism project in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara.

Investment Coordinating Board (BKPM) chairman Gita Wirjawan said Tuesday that Emaar had failed to meet its share of the bargain in developing the project.

Gita said the government, represented by the West Nusa Tenggara government, had followed through with its commitments, including building an airport – to be completed in June – a 31-kilometer road connecting Mataram to the airport and an 18-kilometer road from the airport to Kuta Beach.

“*Emaar* failed to reciprocate in kind. We have taken this decision to ensure fairness and we will look for other possibilities,” Gita said.

The mega-tourism project has been marked by finger-pointing since Emaar signed a joint venture agreement with the Bali Tourism Development Corporation (BTDC) in March 2008. The agreement included establishing a joint venture company called Emaar Lombok.

Emaar claimed last year that the Indonesian government had failed to follow through with some of its promises, citing in particular the clearance of a 1,200-hectare area of land required for construction.

In October, Alwi Shihab, Indonesia’s special envoy to the Middle East, who also worked extensively on the project, said the land dispute was solved and that the project would follow through.

Further development showed that around 1,000 hectares had been set aside by the government for the project but still required certification from the National Land Agency (BPN), while the remainder still belonged to local residents.

A disagreement surrounding the company’s investment contributions and ownership in the joint venture has also overshadowed the project.

State SOE Minister Mustafa Abubakar said earlier this month the deal with Emaar had expired, but the company would be given a chance to sign a new deal.

Both parties had agreed to a Dec. 31 deadline to solve the numerous problems plaguing the project. Mustafa said the deadline would not be extended but said he was willing to have fresh talks with Emaar about restarting the much-delayed project.

Gita hinted that the decision to kick Emaar out of Lombok was also in the interest of the property company as it was currently struggling from the impact of the financial crisis.

“Dubai World has been heavily affected by the financial crisis. They have to restructure $59 billion in debt. This will have repercussions on Emaar, which is based in Dubai.

“The company also embarked on massive projects in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. There are a financial limitation. Secondly, they prefer to focus on settling their problems in the Middle East,” Gita said.

No Emaar official was available for comment Tuesday.

Gita said his office had been in talks with investors interested in replacing Emaar.

“We have met with interested investors. One from the Middle East and another from outside the region,” he said, refusing to elaborate further.

West Nusa Tenggara province, located just east of Bali, has become the central focus of the ministry’s tourism programs, with a specific program aiming to draw one million tourists to the province by 2012.

The province is rich in marine life and will be developed as the center for the pearl trade and ecotourism. Famous Lombok tourist sites include Senggigi Beach, the three Gili islands, Mt. Rinjani and Lake Segara Anak.

Tourist spots in the more secluded Sumbawa Island include Mt. Tambora, Moyo Island, Jelenga Beach and Maluk Beach.

Emaar eyes talks over $600m island resort

by Shane McGinley on Tuesday, 05 January 2010

Emaar Properties will meet with Indonesian authorities in early 2010 to address progress on its $600m planned resort development near Bali, the Dubai developer told Arabian Business on Tuesday.

The Jakarta Globe newspaper last week reported that Indonesian government officials appeared to be distancing themselves from Emaar as their joint venture agreement ran out on December 31.

The $600m Lombok project, launched by the former Indonesian Vice President Jusuf Kalla in May 2007, is planned to be a 1,200-hectare resort located at the Kuta and Tanjung A’an beaches. The project is a joint venture between Emaar, the state-owned Bali Tourism Development Corporation (BTDC) and local government.

In June 2009 at a meeting in Dubai, the Indonesian Government extended the joint venture between Emaar Indonesia and PT Pengembangan Pariwisata Bali (Persero), a government entity, to develop The Lombok Project by the end of the year.

“Emaar is working with Indonesian authorities with a focus on addressing the final pending areas, primarily in relation to transfer of available land. The two parties have agreed to meet in Jakarta in early 2010 to agree on the next steps regarding The Lombok Project,” Emaar said in a statement.

“Communication between Emaar and BTDC is still good. I think the plan could still go forward,” Hilmi Gasim, assistant to Alwi Shihab, the special Indonesian presidential envoy to the Middle East, told the Jakarta Globe

Hotels Lombok fully booked

The upcoming Christmas and New Year holidays have caused 80 percent of all hotels on the island of Lombok, just east of the resort island of Bali, to report completely fully booked weeks. Bookings are made by Indonesians as well as foreigners. On the famous Gili Islands almost all hotels and homestays are fully booked already.

Based on information gathered in the area, there are now some 3.000 tourists on Gili Trawangan. A big part of them are Europeans but there is also a fair share of Jakartans, Surabayans and people from Sulawesi. Owners of hotels and homestays say that most rooms are fully booked until early in the new year from today on. It is even expected that the number of tourists will increase in the few days before New Year’s eve.

Because this high number of visitors, drastic measures are taken to give them all a place to sleep. The main office in the village is now partly in use as temporary shelter for those who are not able to get a room on the island. It is also possible for them to be transferred to nearby Gili Air or Gili Meno. Senggigi, the normally quiet tourist village along the western coast, sees similar crowds flocking to the area.

Resource: http://indahnesia.com/

Lombok eyes 2012

BY LUC CITRINOT, ETN SENIOR MANAGING EDITOR ASIA | NOV 19, 2009

He speaks fluently English and Arabic and his clear way of talking makes a difference with some other Indonesians, rather shy when they have to speak in public. Muhammad Zainul Majdi is the current Governor of West Nusa Tenggara and belongs to this new generation of Indonesian politicians who start to give a new impetus to the World’s biggest archipelago. One of Majdi’s objectives is to turn Lombok into a major tourism destination, emulating Bali, its Western neighbour just 90 minutes away by high speed-boat. Lombok has been so far protected from massive tourism development.

But the Muslim-dominant Island has very big ambitions and feels that it has many assets. “We like to say that you can see Bali in Lombok but you cannot see Lombok in Bali”, likes to say the Governor, referring to the cultural diversity on the Island where local Sasak people cohabits since the dawn of age with Balinese communities. Lombok is indeed an interesting mix of culture where Sasak traditional villages are facing Balinese temples and where some local Muslims are praying indifferently in mosques or temples…

Lombok emergence as a tourism destination will be stimulated by the organization of a “Visit Year Lombok-Sumbawa”- due to come in 2012. Promotion just started with the hosting of TIME-Pasar Wisata, Indonesia’s professional incoming travel show, last October. This is the first time ever that Lombok is hosting an international event from this size and we are very happy about the outcome of the show as delegates seem very happy with this choice. We know that we make some mistakes but we will learn for the next edition of Pasar Wisata in 2010,” said Majdi. For the show hosting, the provincial government has given away INR 5 billion, the equivalent of US$ 532,000.

The objective is to boost over the next five years total arrivals from 250,000 to 450,000 foreign travelers. With domestic travelers, NTB hopes to be able then to welcome some 1.3 million visitors in a year. This will be a far outcry from Bali’s own tourist arrivals (over three million per year currently for both domestic and international travelers) but it still means a growth of over 20% per year over the next decade. More advertising, participation at international travel shows such as ITB are now firmly planned.

Major projects should boost arrivals to Lombok over the years to come: the development of a fully integrated resort area in the South of Lombok and the opening of a new airport in Central Lombok, 45 minutes away from the capital city Mataram. The first project was announced two years ago with Dubai-based investor Emaar Properties announcing to invest US$ 600 million to invest into five- and four-star hotels, a shopping mall, recreation areas, golf courses on a 1,200 hectare site. The final project is targeted to host 10,000 luxury villas, eight hotels and two 18-hole golf courses but it faced numerous delays due to the financial crisis, corruption problems and a lack of improvement in infrastructure. The project study has been extended by six months until year-end.

Development is however more advanced for the airport. According to the airport’s managing company Angkasa Pura, new Lombok International Airport should be finished by the first quarter of 2010 but it looks already that the facility will open later in the year as work is still going on the control tower. Once the first phase completed, the new airport will offer capacity for two million passengers while its 2,750 m runway will be able to take large aircraft such as the Airbus A330. “ We will then target new markets such as Australia or Hong Kong. Improving access is essential for our future” tells Lalu Gita Ariadi, Head of West Nusa Tenggara office of tourism. Another important project is the construction of a proper convention center with an investor from Singapore already showing interest.

Local authorities remain however optimistic about the future of the island as a destination. “Lombok gains increasingly fame among foreign travelers. We do still have some problems to find human resources matching international tourists’ expectations. But the future mega- resort in the South will contribute to improve sharply manpower quality,” estimates Awan Aswinabawa, Chairman of the Travel Expo Pasar Wisata. Progress will definitely be judged with the next hosting of Pasar Wisata in October 2010.

Bron: eturbonews.com

Airport almost ready

Govt eyes finalization of key airport projects

The Jakarta Post , Jakarta | Mon, 11/23/2009 9:14 AM | Business

Airport development projects will be one of the priorities of the Transportation Ministry next year, including the finalization of ongoing expansion projects at three international airports, and constructing up to 31 smaller airports.

The three international airports being upgraded are Kuala Namu International Airport in Medan, North Sumatra, Lombok International Airport in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, and Sultan Hasanuddin International Airport in Makassar, South Sulawesi — with a combined project value of more than Rp 5 trillion (US$509 million).

The ministry’s director of airports, Bambang Tjahjono, said over the weekend that the completion of these projects was urgent and would play vital roles in the economy, both in those regions and the nation as a whole.

“Lombok Airport, for example, will act as buffer for Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport, which is already very busy,” Tjahjono said in an interview.

Lombok is a resort island situated around 70 kilometers east of the world-famous island of Bali.
With a 2,750-meter runway, Lombok Airport will be suitable for larger aircraft such as the Boeing 747, Tjahjono said.

The Lombok Airport complex is built on a 551-hectare plot of land, which is almost twice the size of Ngurah Rai. The project is estimated to cost Rp 802 billion, which is being jointly funded by state airport operator PT Angkasa Pura I and local provincial and regional administrations.

The project has been accelerated, with the government hoping to make it partly open for the public between December or January at the latest.

In the spotlights again

127 foreign buyers to attend tourism expo in Lombok

At least 127 overseas buyers are expected to attend the 2009 Tourism Indonesia Mart and Expo (TIME) in Senggigi, West Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, from Oct. 16 to 19.

The buyers will come from 25 countries, including Australia, Brazil and the United States, as well as from Europe and Asia.

The 15th annual TIME trade fair will feature 119 sellers from 97 tour companies in 16 provinces from across the country offering their tour products, such as from Jakarta, Bali, Central Java and East Kalimantan.

The event, organized by the Indonesian Tourism Promotion Board (BPPI) and involving all elements of the tourism sector in Indonesia, is being held for the first time in Lombok.

This year’s TIME organizing committee head, Meyty Robot, said Thursday the international tourism exposition would concurrently promote Lombok’s tourism potential.

“People all around the world know about Bali and Lombok, but Lombok is not yet a major tourist destination,” Meyty said at a press conference in Senggigi.

Source: Tourism Indonesia